Science

discussion

KID 9718379 KOI 2379.01

Started by troyw
Default_user
almost 6 years ago

Yeah but the paper's conclusion says:

KOI-2379.01: This is a third case in which a secondary eclipse feature appears far from the π phase. The system has a similar period as the other two cases, but for this KOI, the difference between the transit and secondary eclipse features is only a factor ∼2. Hence, an eccentric blended binary appears to be a probable cause of this lightcurve.

Nice pictures in that PDF. Very ... AKO like.

Default_user
almost 5 years ago

Hey Troy, looks like 9718379 still on the KOI list, but not in Prsa V3... So I'm still holding out hope for trojan planets here! And yeah I know, probably a long shot. But somebody has to find them first and it might as well be you. :)

Default_user
almost 5 years ago

Another look with different software routines seems to show two objects here as well. Adjusting for TTV/ETV also shows possible undersampling in the data but my alternating and model fits do look planetary. An alternating O-C plot of that data also shows a possible loose anti-correlation. But the transit data is so sparse here that this might not be statistically significant. Also a UKIRT image shows a faint nearby star, which helps the chances of a binary. But if it's not, it could dilute the light from this star possibly producing these fainter planetary transits. (All things considered anyway.)

Update: no sign of contamination in the mom centroid data. p.s. and yeah, these plots are just with the obvious transit.

FWIW: "In astronomy, a co-orbital configuration refers to two or more celestial objects (such as asteroids, moons, or planets) that orbit at the same, or very similar, distance from their parent object as each other, i.e. they are in a 1:1 mean motion resonance..."

from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-orbital_moon#Co-orbital_moons

...

imgur3

oc1

Update2:

Looking at these transits as two separate p=40.0x objects in TTV or ETV, the fainter transit does appear smaller in size as expected. A quick O-C plot looks loosely correlated, which might work for two Trojan exoplanets or two stars in an eccentric binary system.

p4

oc2

Default_user
almost 5 years ago

Somewhat related....

Maybe this is a rare period of fallout from an unstable binary planet system.

http://arxiv.org/abs/1406.6780

Default_user
almost 5 years ago
ajamyajax in response to troyw

troyw:

Somewhat related....

Maybe this is a rare period of fallout from an unstable binary planet system.

http://arxiv.org/abs/1406.6780

That is interesting, hope it encourages others to look for these unique systems -- especially the professionals. And from the paper this caught my eye simply because it looked like two objects could or might be in the primary transit here. Speculative sure, but "possible" is enough to keep me looking into these some more. Best of luck.

"In previous sections, we showed that the binary gas giant planets are formed through the scattering of three planets..."

Default_user
over 4 years ago

Hmmm, another article that suggests other scientists are thinking about this. So keeping hope alive we'll find something similar in the Kepler data.

"Binary Earth-Size Planets Possible Around Distant Stars"

by Charles Q. Choi, Space.com Contributor

http://www.space.com/27832-binary-earth-size-alien-planets.html

Default_user
over 4 years ago

I'm tellin' ya Troy, not only is this getting more interesting but we are gonna find something like this sooner or later. :)

"Can binary terrestrial planets exist?"

http://phys.org/news/2014-12-binary-terrestrial-planets.html

And I like this comment because it's probably something we could check for (with a little more research; I assume that distance would change with a smaller M dwarf, such as those we work with now on PH2, because of the difference in stellar masses).

"The resulting binary can then persist for billions of years provided it forms well away from the central star, at half an astronomical unit (the distance between the Earth and Sun) or more."

Default_user
over 4 years ago

That would be amazing and undoubtedly rare.

Default_user
over 4 years ago

The TCE data on KOI-2379.1 is interesting. At first look I would have assumed it was BGEB because of 4 entries with similar periods.

However, I actually haven't seen any TCE entries like this system before.

If a planetary system TCE suggests 4 objects of almost equal mass, 2 planets (slightly larger) and 2 moons (slightly smaller) in orbit.

If the primary planet was much larger in mass it might tidally lock the second planet or move like the planets and moons we see in our solar system, but in a scenario of close to equal mass, it's possible they orbit each other probably something like a helix pattern or co-orbit. The Main set of planets is listed with 34 transits, the moons that follow both have about 26 transits listed.

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