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SIAP... A newbie asks about Amplitude Spikes

Started by TriDitty
Default_user
almost 7 years ago

Hey fellas, I am a newbie planet hunter and after going thru the training lit I could not help but think that some of the spikes that we see in the light amplitude might be a planet just coming out from the other side of a star. this is very easy to see if you go to the "Whats this?" section of the two STEREO sats on the solar stormwatch site and see how planets coming out of the other side of our own sun are very bright right when they pop out from behind the sun.

I did see a few posts mentioning inverse tranistions and I have to think that this idea must have already been discussed. If the measurements can show us an emerging planet's extra reflection as a peak in the star's overall light, then I must wonder if we can identify this spike in between the two dips in data.

Also, could we expect the spikes to be relatively proportional in amplitude to the dips? Can we expect the spikes to be half the amplitude of the dips or perhaps twice the amplitude? Would the ratio of the amplitude of the dips to spikes say anything in particular about the planet's size or composition?

I am sorry if this is all old news to you guys but I just think that knowing whether or not to expect the spikes in between the planet's transitions can help me to find a planet that might not catch my eye if I am only looking for dips.

Default_user
almost 7 years ago

A transit looks like a line of dots that go down. it also needs to repeat

Default_user
almost 7 years ago

Have you taken a look at our site guide - it's a good resource for people new to the project.

Cheers,

~Meg

Default_user
almost 7 years ago

tac1017:

A transit looks like a line of dots that go down. it also needs to repeat

That's actually not true. The orbital period of the planet which determines when the repeat transit will happen, may be longer than 30 days. If that's the case you will not see a repeat transit on the 30 day timescale of data we show you. So there could be a single transit in the light curve you see.

Cheers,

~Meg

Default_user
almost 7 years ago

mschwamb:

Have you taken a look at our site guide - it's a good resource for people new to the project.

Cheers,

~Meg

I've read a good bit of this site's lit and I think that I am getting a little better as I go. At first I didn't want to miss anything to the point where I was seeing patterns in nearly every group of dots but I am trying to tone my imagination down a notch.

I am still curious though. Can these graphs show a positive spike in the star's light just before and after a planet goes behind a star? I got this thought from watching the planets in our own solar system as thay were coming out from behind our sun on the STEREO sats. They seem to reflect the most light right before they go behind the sun and immediately after they come out from behind the sun. At least it seems that way but the solar storm watch is set up to tone the Sun's light down a bunch so that you can see flares, comets, etc better.

I am sure that the additional light is extremely small but it would be cool if we could learn anything new or just use the spike in light to verify what we might already know.

Thnx again and sorry if this is stupid question.

Default_user
almost 7 years ago

TriDitty:

I've read a good bit of this site's lit and I think that I am getting a little better as I go. At first I didn't want to miss anything to the point where I was seeing patterns in nearly every group of dots but I am trying to tone my imagination down a notch.

I am still curious though. Can these graphs show a positive spike in the star's light just before and after a planet goes behind a star? I got this thought from watching the planets in our own solar system as thay were coming out from behind our sun on the STEREO sats. They seem to reflect the most light right before they go behind the sun and immediately after they come out from behind the sun. At least it seems that way but the solar storm watch is set up to tone the Sun's light down a bunch so that you can see flares, comets, etc better.

I am sure that the additional light is extremely small but it would be cool if we could learn anything new or just use the spike in light to verify what we might already know.

Thnx again and sorry if this is stupid question.

I'm happy to answer questions (where I can :-) ) . I'm not sure about the effect you're talking about in STEREO images. This also might be, because of geometry caused by the fact observer (ie spacecraft) are closer to these objects. But when you're really far away there shouldn't be an effect like that when viewing transits. There is an effect from limb darkening (the sun's disk is darker on the edges than at the center) that effect the shape of the light curve but we shouldn't really see much of a brightening above the typical brightness of the star.

You can learn things about the atmosphere of the planet from the transits if you observe the transit in different wavelengths (colors of light) and observe the star when the planet is behind the star (secondary eclipse) and completely blocked out and you have just the star's light and then observe during a transit where some of the light is going through the planet's atmosphere and is being absorbed. Dividing one by the other you get what the spectrum of the planet's atmosphere is and can try and see what composes it. We call this transmission spectroscopy.

~Meg

Default_user
almost 7 years ago

mschwamb:

TriDitty:

I've read a good bit of this site's lit and I think that I am getting a little better as I go. At first I didn't want to miss anything to the point where I was seeing patterns in nearly every group of dots but I am trying to tone my imagination down a notch.

I am still curious though. Can these graphs show a positive spike in the star's light just before and after a planet goes behind a star? I got this thought from watching the planets in our own solar system as thay were coming out from behind our sun on the STEREO sats. They seem to reflect the most light right before they go behind the sun and immediately after they come out from behind the sun. At least it seems that way but the solar storm watch is set up to tone the Sun's light down a bunch so that you can see flares, comets, etc better.

I am sure that the additional light is extremely small but it would be cool if we could learn anything new or just use the spike in light to verify what we might already know.

Thnx again and sorry if this is stupid question.

I'm happy to answer questions (where I can :-) ) . I'm not sure about the effect you're talking about in STEREO images. This also might be, because of geometry caused by the fact observer (ie spacecraft) are closer to these objects. But when you're really far away there shouldn't be an effect like that when viewing transits. There is an effect from limb darkening (the sun's disk is darker on the edges than at the center) that effect the shape of the light curve but we shouldn't really see much of a brightening above the typical brightness of the star.

You can learn things about the atmosphere of the planet from the transits if you observe the transit in different wavelengths (colors of light) and observe the star when the planet is behind the star (secondary eclipse) and completely blocked out and you have just the star's light and then observe during a transit where some of the light is going through the planet's atmosphere and is being absorbed. Dividing one by the other you get what the spectrum of the planet's atmosphere is and can try and see what composes it. We call this transmission spectroscopy.

~Meg

Thnx much much

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