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What are the Objects with Confirmed Planets?

Started by the_jetset
Default_user
over 8 years ago

The Kepler team has confirmed and released 8 planet detections around 6 different stars. (one star has 3 planets) In addition, there are already 3 other stars with confirmed planets from other missions. (9 stars with confirmed transiting planets total) This leads me to two questions:

1)  What are the Object ID \#'s for these confirmed transits so we can see the data for comparison?



2)  How do we search for a specific Object's ID\# from the "classify" section of the web-page?

Thanks,

Eric

Default_user
over 8 years ago

Sorry, in my previous post, the text was reduced for my questions. I think it had something to do with the "number" symbol I included. The questions are as follows

1 - What are the Object ID numbers for the Kepler stars that have confirmed transits?

2 - How do we search for a specific Object ID number in the CLASSIFY section of the web-page?

Default_user
over 8 years ago

Sorry for messing up the other thread - Some of the data are already identified as candidates planets (DPH10038a9?page=2) - I don't know about the confirmed planets. In the FAQs again it says the stars don't have their 'real' names...

Default_user
over 8 years ago

Thanks. I understand that most of them will not have real names, or even numbers. I was referring to the serial number for the sake of including them and referencing them in the database. I've noticed that in this program they are given an "SPH" number ... for instance: SPH10107233 ... this is probably the serial number. All the objects have "Kepler ID" numbers that are used to identify the raw data.

Is there any way to search for a specific ID number from the data??? So far, it only assigns random objects to you.

Does anyone know what the ID numbers are for the stars that already have confirmed planets transiting them??

Thanks,

Eric

Default_user
over 8 years ago

Hunting exoplanets is a very competitive area of science. We use our own ids to protect your discovery.We have the real name and coordinates of every star and so if you spot a new exoplanet, we want to make sure nobody can just announce its discovery without giving you credit. - Meg from the Science Team

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