KID 8462852 - Quarter 8, Quarter 16 and Quarter 17

Started by cappella
Default_user
about 6 years ago

Indeed strange, the eclipse profile in Q16 looks largely the same in SAP_FLUX:

I can't quite reconcile the smaller dips at 140 (Q1), 792 (Q13) and 1540 (Q16) as secondaries to make this an eccentric EB. Nothing to match smaller dip 1540 is found near 813, unless it occurred early and was lost in the data break from 802-808...

Default_user
about 6 years ago

Q8 and Q16 TPFs:

FULL

FULL

Unrelated, but there appears to be a separate, eccentric EB barely leaking into a single pixel at the top edge of the mask.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

I don't know if this means anything, the star is an infra-red source:

2MASS-J: Two Micron All Sky Survey (J-Band)

1'x 1'

Default_user
about 6 years ago

@Nighthawk_black: that cartoon had me in stitches :-)

Default_user
about 6 years ago

@cappella

The infrared image let me think that one of the stars near our targets must have an extended source around it (an accretion disk maybe).

Default_user
about 6 years ago

@zoo3hans

That thought had also crossed my mind :-)

Default_user
about 6 years ago
planetsam in response to zoo3hans

@zoo3hans

Yes I just thought exactly the same from seeing that IR image. This would partially explain the long eclipses.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

Wow that is intriguing there seems to be an IR excess associated with this point source.

If it's a giant / MS binary, I'm wondering if there could be both a circumbinary disc and then a smaller accretion disc around the transiting stellar object. I'm not sure that the latter could produce such a big IR signature by itself. If the transiting star is obscured and the accretion disc is not self luminous, it might explain why we don't see any secondary eclipse (although the simpler explanation there may simply be that the inclination is such that it doesn't occur).

The floor is only ~6 hours long. If there is an accretion disc involved and it's only grazing, could the right inclination produce this light curve?

I had an idea that if such a disc had a big gap or a cleared center, it might account for the ingress anomaly. So the smaller star isn't actually starting to cross the primary until just after this, around BJD ~1519.16. Warning: crude, not to scale graphic ahead

The true situation is probably nothing like this, but it seemed like a good opportunity to rampantly speculate in Paint. :)

Default_user
about 6 years ago

All quarters:

Default_user
almost 6 years ago

Nice find (and great discussion). I want to believe in the accretion disk but the fact the two biggest drops are so large and yet different in amplitude by quite a lot scares me off. We'll have to see what the experts make of this.

Chris

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