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Default_user
almost 8 years ago
christheneck in response to gfireman

Experiencing similar problem

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

Sorry but the tutorial is hopeless. What am I looking at? Seems to be a section of the Milky Way - or is it one star captured over time? I really don't know what I'm being asked to do.

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

Look at this, tell me, what am I doing here?

APH10150664

Default_user
almost 8 years ago
  1. Using Firefox 3.6.13 on MacOS 10.5.8

  2. The word balloon containing action buttons partially obscures the data.

  3. Why isn't data always normalized to a mean of 1.0?

  4. The horizontal scrollbar is counterintuitive; should indicate what is visible, not what is hidden.

  5. Initial data display hides some of the latest data. Default visibility should be available time +/- 5%.

  6. Need a tutorial on how to use the vertical scaling button.

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

Hi, I'm Meg from the Science team. It's not a bug, we're reminding you to log in so you can get credit for your discoveries and get access to the best lightcurves. Right now you're using on non-logged in interface. You can make a zooniverse account which will give you an account for Planet Hunters and all of the other zooniverse projects by either going to the log link on the top of the page or clicking yes when you get prompted again.

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

A Kepler favorite is a star that the Kepler team has marked as potentially having a transiting planet - but are still confirming with follow-up observations

Meg Schwamb- from the Science Team

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

Thanks for that! In that case the Kepler team and I are not entirely in agreement!!!

Ah well - back to the drawing board....

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

have you checked out the tutorial video (http://www.planethunters.org/science#started) - there is the vertical adjust feature which will allow you to scroll along the lightcurve without automatically adjusting the vertical y zoom

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

Hi - I'm Debra from the Science team. The light curve for this star, APH10150664, looks constant to me. There are a number of points that fall below the swath of data (which scatter because of measurement error) but they are lone points, not a series of points that start at the normal level, dip down for a few points, then rise back to the normal brightness level. That would be a typical transit signal. So, I'd classify this one as "quiet" on the second question and "no transit features" on the third question.

Default_user
almost 8 years ago

Have you checked out the tutorial video - http://www.planethunters.org/science#started

Meg Schwamb from the Science Team

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