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Version 2 Feature Requests

Started by mschwamb
Default_user
about 6 years ago

I would second the opinion of steve220. I usually look at junks of 5 days too. Maybe yet another button would fix the y-axis to +/- 2-3 * standard deviation.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

I also make a quick survey and then look at the data 5 days at a time.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

One useful enhancement to the website would be a PH candidates table analogous to the Kepler Planetary Candidates table. This would allow users to access, in one convenient location, the most crucial information for each PH planetary candidate found.

By crucial information I mean that which identifies and characterizes the planet. My suggested list includes the following items (italicized items are hyperlinks to the relevant source pages at PH or NStED):

Planet ID – Unique ID for the PH planetary candidate.

KOI – Kepler Object of Interest number for the planet. Filled in upon promotion of the PH planet to a KOI by the Kepler science team.

Confirmed Planet Name – Official name of the Kepler planet. Filled in upon confirmation of the KOI by the Kepler science team.

SPH ID – SPH reference number for the host star.

Kepler ID – Kepler ID for the host star.

Transit Midpoint – Time, in days, for the first planetary transit in the time series. When used with the Transit Period below, each planetary transit in the time series can be located.

Transit Duration – Average duration, in hours, for a transit.

Transit Period – Average time interval, in days, between transits.

Semi-Major Axis – Distance, in AUs, from planet to host star.

Planet Radius – The estimated radius of the planet in Earth radii.

Of course, the table could be expanded further with other useful information such as vetting and status flags. However, I consider the above items as the highest priority.

In summary, a table like this will help to identify, characterize, and track PH candidates. Additionally, it will be useful for untangling planets in light curves with multiple candidates, potentially a combination of both Kepler and PH planets.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

Update the algorithm that presents light curves, so that a user does not get the same star twice.

Today I had the same Kepler Favorite for a second time. Different quarter but the same star. This could have happened on other stars without my noticing, but when going to comment on the star, I found that I had been to another quarters data for the same star.

I believe there is logic so that a user isn't presented the same LC twice. I suggest updating it so that we don't get the same star twice. If a star is interesting I will look at the other quarters data anyway to see if something is there. Admittedly there may be something in only one quarter, but that is true of any star. Also the metric "Your Stars" implies that we are tracking stars (a percentage of 150,000) not light curves.

ps - I also look at data 5 days at a time.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

May I request a "simulator" tab that would allow users to enter a planet with x radius at an orbital period of x around a star that has x properties to see what kind of effect the planet would have on the LC. I think this would be very helpful in showing people what to look for.

Also, while identifying potential transits, I think it would be helpful to have a tool to measure if the LC dip is periodic (set two points on the graph and tell the tool to show where the next one would be)

Default_user
about 6 years ago
alschmitt in response to Astronut25

Astronut25:

Also, while identifying potential transits, I think it would be helpful to have a tool to measure if the LC dip is periodic (set two points on the graph and tell the tool to show where the next one would be)

I second the motion for a feature in the Light Curve Viewer that marks out equally spaced points across the light curve given a starting and ending point. Not only would this be useful for linking up all the transits for a planet but also other types of time-based symmetrical phenomena such as circumplanetary disks. Note that this feature will be especially important once the Light Curve Viewer is able to display the full time series available where periodicity of phenomena will be easier to establish.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

A link to the planet hunters blog directly from planethunters.org.

Default_user
about 6 years ago

steve220:

A link to the planet hunters blog directly from planethunters.org.

We have one, it's a bit hidden but it's the third little button on the top right

Default_user
about 6 years ago

Would users find it useful to have a ruler on the interface, to allow measuring/ comparison of intervals/ periodicity? I study Electrocardiograph readings at work, and this type of device can be very useful in that regard. E.g. Mark an interval between two or three candidates and move it along the light curve to help pick out corresponding candidates that might be more difficult to spot. I also agree with the PH who suggests being able to adjust the y-axis like the x-axis

Default_user
about 6 years ago

Could there be an improvement with communication? Maybe connect the sites membership with places like facebook - I feel there are a lot of discussions that go "undiscussed" because of poor navigation on discussion boards

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