Science

discussion

RINGS & MOONS

Started by ggccg
Default_user
over 6 years ago

Thanks Meg, yes I have read it.

Default_user
over 6 years ago
ggccg in response to zoo3hans

zoo3hans:

@Gerald

APH23022808 is not big I guess, but it occured to me that there might be symmetrical smaller dips to the left and right (about 1 day), again a sign of possible dips? I'd really like to see some good simulations of ring transits.

A very nice find as a planet alone! The smaller features aren't quite symmetrical: the drop on the left is farther way from the main transit than the one on the right. Perhaps a pair of moons?

Default_user
over 6 years ago
toniscarmato in response to ggccg

ggccg:

toniscarmato:

Look like interesting! http://talk.planethunters.org/objects/APH21134325

He's sort of right. Neptune sized planets are not exactly our poster child candidates, but Neptune's rings are also very thin and narrow. That said, if you do see a Neptune sized transit that has the signature features we are considering, by all means post it.

There are a couple of reasons why I emphasized in my original post here that we should limit our searches to LARGE PLANET transits:

  1. Large planets seem to be more likely to have rings that may be detectable.

  2. Large planets are more likely to have moons that are large enough to be detectable.

Bigger is Better. Please keep that in mind before posting.

Thanks for the useful comment!

Default_user
over 6 years ago
ggccg in response to toniscarmato

toniscarmato:

ggccg:

toniscarmato:

Look like interesting! http://talk.planethunters.org/objects/APH21134325

He's sort of right. Neptune sized planets are not exactly our poster child candidates, but Neptune's rings are also very thin and narrow. That said, if you do see a Neptune sized transit that has the signature features we are considering, by all means post it.

There are a couple of reasons why I emphasized in my original post here that we should limit our searches to LARGE PLANET transits:

  1. Large planets seem to be more likely to have rings that may be detectable.

  2. Large planets are more likely to have moons that are large enough to be detectable.

Bigger is Better. Please keep that in mind before posting.

Thanks for the useful comment!

That said, however, take a look at zoo3hans' post above about APH23022808. His find appears to be a 1.6 RE @ 1 AU on a .5xSol star. I guess it's true that rules are made to be broken.

Default_user
over 6 years ago

Here's a (scholarly) article that Meg passed along, on possible transits of planets with ring systems, including figures: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...616.1193B It’s definitely worth a look.

Default_user
over 6 years ago

Look at this one! http://talk.planethunters.org/objects/APH23037913

Default_user
over 6 years ago

Maybe this star APH22714177 has some interesting brown dwarf around it.

Default_user
over 6 years ago

@toniscarmato

to me APH23037913 looks not much different at 101 than say at 104.5 or at 114. I doubt it's a transit at all.

Default_user
over 6 years ago
toniscarmato in response to zoo3hans

zoo3hans:

@toniscarmato

to me APH23037913 looks not much different at 101 than say at 104.5 or at 114. I doubt it's a transit at all.

Ok, thanks!

Default_user
over 6 years ago
ggccg in response to zoo3hans

zoo3hans:

Maybe this star APH22714177 has some interesting brown dwarf around it.

Very interesting on a couple of levels. I'm the one who brought this star to kianjin's attention to begin with. When I was checking it to post it's details, I noticed that the published period didn't make sense, and now it's bounced back to me. Synchronicity at work.

Anyway, I have a theory that I invite you all to pick away at. But first, here is a typical transit of the presumed brown dwarf:

The central section looks like another transit within the transit. I suggest that it might be from a moon transiting the brown dwarf. But what about those "ears" to on each side of the small transit? Could those be the result of rings around the moon refracting light from the brown dwarf? With the size of the brown dwarf estimated at 3.23 R-Jupiter, it could certainly support a very large moon.

See the post by kianjin earlier in this thread about possible brightness spikes just before and after an EB transit, possibly due to refraction from rings.

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